eliaes:

đź‘Źđź‘Ź

(via catsoncoffee)

wellheyproductions:

heysoo:

roselalalonde:


thenimbus:



R.I.P. Ato Essandoh



uh

https://twitter.com/AtoEssandoh


JESUS

CHRIST

THIS DUDE.

^^I have a new sass-master role model in my life.

wellheyproductions:

heysoo:

roselalalonde:

thenimbus:

R.I.P. Ato Essandoh

uh

image

https://twitter.com/AtoEssandoh

JESUS

image

CHRIST

image

THIS DUDE.

^^I have a new sass-master role model in my life.

(via hornynerdythings)

oafmeal:

AAAND NAILED IT.

Hahaha.

(Source: jonsnowflakes)

nerdofwar:

Company in Seattle makes AMAZING Death Star Home Theatre for Undisclosed Client.

Star Wars Home Theater
No kidding; this theater is in someone’s house! This is NOT your father’s Death Star theater… unless, of course, you happen to be Luke Skywalker. DillonWorks…

(via hornynerdythings)

wilwheaton:

prbuick11:

nichtsoweiss:

brokenheels-brokenheart:

Puppies in bow ties are just perfect

prbuick11 bloogue
HAVE YOU GUYS SEEN THIS PERFECTION?!?!

BUH BRENT LOOK!!

Ties (bow or neck) make even the cutest dog in the world 600000000 times cuter. #SCIENCE

academicatheism:

Cambridge Study Reveals How Life Could Have Started From Nothing
One of the most challenging questions in basic biology and the history of evolution and life stems from the unknown origin of the first cells billions of years ago. Though many pieces of the puzzle have been put together, this origin story remains somewhat murky. But a team of researchers from the University of Cambridge believe they’ve accidentally stumbled on an answer, and a very compelling one at that.
The discovery: Through routine quality control testing, a researcher working with Markus Ralser, who would eventually become the lead researcher for the project, stumbled upon signs of the metabolic process where, for all intents and purposes, there shouldn’t have been. Until now, much of the science community has generally agreed that Ribonucleic acid, or RNA, was the first building block of life because it produces enzymes that could catalyze complex sequences of reactions such as metabolic action. However, Ralser’s lab found the end products of the metabolic process without any presence of RNA. Instead, the findings indicate that complex and life-forming reactions like these could occur spontaneously given the right, but surprisingly simple, conditions.
Continue Reading

academicatheism:

Cambridge Study Reveals How Life Could Have Started From Nothing

One of the most challenging questions in basic biology and the history of evolution and life stems from the unknown origin of the first cells billions of years ago. Though many pieces of the puzzle have been put together, this origin story remains somewhat murky. But a team of researchers from the University of Cambridge believe they’ve accidentally stumbled on an answer, and a very compelling one at that.

The discovery: Through routine quality control testing, a researcher working with Markus Ralser, who would eventually become the lead researcher for the project, stumbled upon signs of the metabolic process where, for all intents and purposes, there shouldn’t have been. Until now, much of the science community has generally agreed that Ribonucleic acid, or RNA, was the first building block of life because it produces enzymes that could catalyze complex sequences of reactions such as metabolic action. However, Ralser’s lab found the end products of the metabolic process without any presence of RNA. Instead, the findings indicate that complex and life-forming reactions like these could occur spontaneously given the right, but surprisingly simple, conditions.

Continue Reading

nudityandnerdery:

assassinationtipsforladies:

If you could be a root vegetable, which one would you be and why? (x)

That moment you realize Vin Diesel was secretly a huge nerd this whole time

Vin Diesel talks a lot about how much he loves D&D, he’s never been secretly anything.

"I’d be a beet…because any beat and you can dance." Come on!

(Source: chrispratz, via hornynerdythings)

amnhnyc:

Spiders are important predators. By one estimate, the spiders on one acre of woodland alone consume more than 80 pounds (36 kg) of insects a year. (Those insect populations would explode without the predators.)
Spiders employ an amazing array of techniques to capture prey.
They play tricks:
Some pirate spiders of the family Mimetidae fool their prey: other spiders. They vibrate the spiders’ webs the same way a struggling insect might. Then, when the host spiders come close, the pirates grab them.
They spit: 
Spiders of the genus Scytodes catch prey by ejecting a glue from their chelicerae (spider mouthparts that end in fangs and inject venom into prey). Once it hits, the gooey substance shrinks, trapping the prey in place.
They use a home field advantage:
Lynx spiders of the family Oxyopidae hunt on plants. They are agile, jumping from stem to stem, and have better vision than many other spiders.
Learn more spider hunting techniques on our blog. 

amnhnyc:

Spiders are important predators. By one estimate, the spiders on one acre of woodland alone consume more than 80 pounds (36 kg) of insects a year. (Those insect populations would explode without the predators.)

Spiders employ an amazing array of techniques to capture prey.

They play tricks:

Some pirate spiders of the family Mimetidae fool their prey: other spiders. They vibrate the spiders’ webs the same way a struggling insect might. Then, when the host spiders come close, the pirates grab them.

They spit: 

Spiders of the genus Scytodes catch prey by ejecting a glue from their chelicerae (spider mouthparts that end in fangs and inject venom into prey). Once it hits, the gooey substance shrinks, trapping the prey in place.

They use a home field advantage:

Lynx spiders of the family Oxyopidae hunt on plants. They are agile, jumping from stem to stem, and have better vision than many other spiders.

Learn more spider hunting techniques on our blog. 

(via sagansense)

astronomicalwonders:

A Rose in Space - NGC 2237
This flower-shaped nebula, also known by the less romantic name NGC 2237, is a huge star-forming cloud of dust and gas in our Milky Way galaxy. Estimates of the nebula’s distance vary from 4,500 to 5,000 light-years away.
At the center of the flower is a cluster of young stars called NGC 2244. The most massive stars produce huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, and blow strong winds that erode away the nearby gas and dust, creating a large, central hole. The radiation also strips electrons from the surrounding hydrogen gas, ionizing it and creating what astronomers call an HII region.
Credit: NASA/JPL

astronomicalwonders:

A Rose in Space - NGC 2237

This flower-shaped nebula, also known by the less romantic name NGC 2237, is a huge star-forming cloud of dust and gas in our Milky Way galaxy. Estimates of the nebula’s distance vary from 4,500 to 5,000 light-years away.

At the center of the flower is a cluster of young stars called NGC 2244. The most massive stars produce huge amounts of ultraviolet radiation, and blow strong winds that erode away the nearby gas and dust, creating a large, central hole. The radiation also strips electrons from the surrounding hydrogen gas, ionizing it and creating what astronomers call an HII region.

Credit: NASA/JPL

(via gravitationalbeauty)