jtotheizzoe:

boop.
This man.

Always reblog….the cutest GIF ever. 

jtotheizzoe:

boop.

This man.

Always reblog….the cutest GIF ever. 

cakeandrevolution:

Accurate depiction of fox news.

(Source: northgang, via catsoncoffee)

nation-of-homeskillets:

he knows what hes done

(Source: heckyeahmikerowe, via scum-and-villiany)

I need to stop wasting time on people who make none for me.

"There are two great mysteries that overshadow all other mysteries in science. One is the origin of the universe. That’s my day job. However, there is also the other great mystery of inner space. And that is what sits on your shoulders, which believe it or not, is the most complex object in the known universe. But the brain only uses 20 watts of power. It would require a nuclear power plant to energise a computer the size of a city block to mimic your brain, and your brain does it with just 20 watts. So if someone calls you a dim bulb, that’s a compliment."

Michio Kaku

(via science-junkie)

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

Nathan Fillion poses as “Star Trek’s” Captain Kirk (x)

(Source: captainfillion)

thenewenlightenmentage:

Plasma physics: The fusion upstarts
Fuelled by venture capital and a lot of hope, alternative fusion technologies are heating up.
To reach one of the world’s most secretive nuclear-fusion companies, visitors must wind their way through a suburban office park at the foot of the Santa Ana Mountains, just east of Irvine, California, until they pull up outside the large but unmarked headquarters of Tri Alpha Energy.
This is as close as any outsider can get without signing a non-disclosure agreement; Tri Alpha protects its trade secrets so tightly that it does not even have a website. But the fragments of information that have filtered out make it clear that the building houses one of the largest fusion experiments now operating in the United States. It is also one of the most unconventional. Instead of using the doughnut-shaped ‘tokamak’ reactor that has dominated fusion-energy research for more than 40 years, Tri Alpha is testing a linear reactor that it claims will be smaller, simpler and cheaper — and will lead to commercial fusion power in little more than a decade, far ahead of the 30 to 50 years often quoted for tokamaks.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Plasma physics: The fusion upstarts

Fuelled by venture capital and a lot of hope, alternative fusion technologies are heating up.

To reach one of the world’s most secretive nuclear-fusion companies, visitors must wind their way through a suburban office park at the foot of the Santa Ana Mountains, just east of Irvine, California, until they pull up outside the large but unmarked headquarters of Tri Alpha Energy.

This is as close as any outsider can get without signing a non-disclosure agreement; Tri Alpha protects its trade secrets so tightly that it does not even have a website. But the fragments of information that have filtered out make it clear that the building houses one of the largest fusion experiments now operating in the United States. It is also one of the most unconventional. Instead of using the doughnut-shaped ‘tokamak’ reactor that has dominated fusion-energy research for more than 40 years, Tri Alpha is testing a linear reactor that it claims will be smaller, simpler and cheaper — and will lead to commercial fusion power in little more than a decade, far ahead of the 30 to 50 years often quoted for tokamaks.

Continue Reading

yknowforkids:

Happy 86th birthday to Vera Rubin (b. July 23, 1928), a pioneering astronomer who uncovered the galaxy rotation problem. While attempting to explain the galaxy rotation problem, she encountered some of the most firm evidence up to that time of dark matter.

Via American Museum of Natural History.

(via sagansense)